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Posts Tagged ‘PCR’

After whole genome sequencing comes PCR

In Uncategorized on October 23, 2008 at 8:56 am


post to news.thinkgene.com

I attended an Applied Biosystems SOLiD seminar the other day. Let me tell you this: the SOLiD system packs some serious sequencing power (as does it’s competitors like Illumina, -and possibly others). Only imagination sets limits to the potential uses for such whole genome (and whole transcriptome !) sequencing. Thus, I found myself continuously drifting off, dream-designing new projects we could set up. But, at the same time I couldn’t keep from thinking that in terms of diagnostics, this a massive overkill. Too much information is not always a good thing when it comes to disease and disease predisposition. If one particular genetic variation is relevant to the symptoms presented, then there’s hardly necessary to return the whole genome or transcriptome. You would end up giving the patient information on a whole range of diseases, – the patient may not want/need to know this. Especially since we know that (currently) there is considerable uncertainty surrounding the future disease-risk associated with most genetic markers. Besides, once you know the relevant genetic regions it would probably be sufficient to run a couple of million markers to determine any predisposition.

Early model of a Polymerase Chain Reaction mac...

Good (?, and really) old PCR.

Image via Wikipedia

Thus, all of these projects ended with good old PCR, which is kind of strange since sequencing one would think, is the superior of the two technologies. Here’s how I figured my (would be) whole genome sequencing projects would go:

  1. Pick species/subspecies/individual trait or disease group
  2. Sequence everything you can get your hands on
  3. Characterize genetic differences be it SNPs, indels, repeats, CNV or any other
  4. And then, …..design PCR/real-time PCR assays for diagnostics/further research and such.

Because, obviously, once everything is sequenced, there’s no need to keep sequencing. My prediction is that at that point (real-time) PCR (and quite possibly Sanger sequencing capillary electrophoresis) will regain it’s lost status as preferred tools for molecular biologists.

So, as a comfort to all those who are unable to jump on the whole genome sequencing train: Not to worry ! We’re just going through a phase. This too shall pass.

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